An introduction to the english and spanish colonist

Spanish American wars of independence Spanish colonialization in the Americas. The Libertadores Spanish and Portuguese for "Liberators" were the principal leaders of the Spanish American wars of independence. They were predominantly criollos Americas-born people of European ancestry, mostly Spanish or Portuguesebourgeois and influenced by liberalism and in some cases with military training in the mother country.

An introduction to the english and spanish colonist

The program looks at the beginnings of American history from west to east, following the first Ice Age migrations through the corn civilizations of Middle America, and the explorations of Columbus, DeSoto, and the Spanish.

John Rolfe - Wikipedia

Go to this unit. English Settlement As the American character begins to take shape in the early seventeenth century, English settlements develop in New England and Virginia. Their personalities are dramatically different. Professor Miller explores the origins of values, cultures, and economies that have collided in the North and South throughout the American story.

As the merchant class grows in the North, the economies of southern colonies are built on the shoulders of the slave trade. The Coming of Independence Professor Maier tells the story of how the English-loving colonist transforms into the freedom-loving American rebel.

The luminaries of the early days of the Republic -- Washington, Jefferson, Adams -- are featured in this program as they craft the Declaration of -- and wage the War for -- Independence.

Professor Maier looks at the creation of the Constitution of the United States. The Republic survives a series of threats to its union, and the program ends with the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson on the Fourth of July, Westward Expansion At the dawn of the nineteenth century, the size of the United States doubles with the Louisiana Purchase.

American historian Stephen Ambrose joins Professors Maier and Miller in examining the consequences of the Louisiana Purchase -- for the North, the South, and the history of the country.

The Rise of Capitalism Individual enterprise merges with technological innovation to launch the Commercial Revolution -- the seedbed of American industry. The Reform Impulse The Industrial Revolution has its dark side, and the tumultuous events of the period touch off intense and often thrilling reform movements.

Slavery While the North develops an industrial economy and culture, the South develops a slave culture and economy, and the great rift between the regions becomes unbreachable.

An introduction to the english and spanish colonist

Professor Masur looks at the human side of the history of the mids by sketching a portrait of the lives of slave and master. The Coming of the Civil War Simmering regional differences ignite an all-out crisis in the s.

Reconstruction Professor Miller begins the program by evoking in word and picture the battlefield after the battle of Gettysburg.

With the assassination of President Lincoln, one sad chapter of American history comes to a close. Professor Miller and his team of historians examine where America is in and discuss the question of race. Industrial Supremacy Steel and stockyards are featured in this program as the mighty engine of industrialism thunders forward at the end of the nineteenth century.

Professor Miller continues the story of the American Industrial Revolution in New York and Chicago, looking at the lives of Andrew Carnegie, Gustavus Swift, and the countless workers in the packinghouse and on the factory floor. The New City Professor Miller explores the tension between the messy vitality of cities that grow on their own and those where orderly growth is planned.

Feminists gain a foothold in their fight for the right to vote, while farmers organize and the Populist Party appears on the American political landscape. Capital and Labor The making of money pits laborers against the forces of capital as the twentieth century opens.

Professor Miller introduces the miner as the quintessential laborer of the period -- working under grinding conditions, organizing into unions, and making a stand against the reigning money man of the day, J.

A Vital Progressivism Professor Martin offers a fresh perspective on Progressivism, arguing that its spirit can be best seen in the daily struggles of ordinary people.

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In a discussion with Professors Scharff and Miller, the struggles of Native Americans, Asian Americans, and African Americans are placed in the context of the traditional white Progressive movement.

World War II America is enveloped in total war, from mobilization on the home front to a scorching air war in Europe. The Fifties World War II is fought to its bitter end in the Pacific and the world lives with the legacy of its final moment: The Sixties Professor Scharff weaves the story of the Civil Rights movement with stories of the Vietnam War and Watergate to create a portrait of a decade.

Lyndon Johnson emerges as a pivotal character, along with Stokely Carmichael, Fanny Lou Hamer, and other luminaries of the era. Contemporary History The entire team of historians joins Professor Miller in examining the last quarter of the twentieth century.

A montage of events opens the program and sets the stage for a discussion of the period -- and of the difficulty of examining contemporary history with true historical perspective.

Jamestown Settlement and the "Starving Time" [skybox2008.com]

Television critic John Leonard offers a footnote about the impact of television on the way we experience recent events.Colonial Williamsburg journal, a popular history magazine about historic Williamsburg its people.

Giving the slip to censoring eyes, interpreters Richard Gilliland and Megan Brown climb into a hayloft to kindle a mock courtship. Jul 31,  · An Online Tagalog - English Dictionary Learn Tagalog or Filipino Language for free. Colonial Williamsburg journal, a popular history magazine about historic Williamsburg its people.

Biography. Rolfe was born in Heacham, Norfolk, England, as the son of John Rolfe and Dorothea Mason, and was baptized on 6 May At the time, Spain held a virtual monopoly on the lucrative tobacco trade.

Most Spanish colonies in the New World were located in southern climates more favorable to tobacco growth than the English settlements, notably Jamestown.

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William Penn | English Quaker leader and colonist | skybox2008.com